Knock Knock…who’s there?

‘Get your hands off my miscarriage!’

Series 2, Episode 1 of Fleabag. Since watching this a few days ago, I haven’t been able to shake that line out of my head. Reading it back in isolation, it seems a bit disturbing. But such is the skill of Phoebe Waller-Bridge’s writing – a quasi-comedy delivery which tempers the impact, while simultaneously heightening its emotional poignancy. The potency of the (dark) humour in that scene is why I’m thinking about it still, days afterwards. It’s also why I’m considering writing a comedy myself, as well as inspiring this blog.

Laughter and laughing is a massive priority to me, and I think most people would agree with it’s emotional, mental, and spiritual benefits. That naturally extends to when we’re in ‘entertainment mode’, whether reading, watching a programme or a film; we seek out and appreciate laughter in those spaces too. When executed well, comedy truly elevates writing/a story into something immeasurably more gratifying. My sense of humour bends towards darker, obscure, satirical, situational, and character-based, and screenwriting offers a much richer and diverse landscape than fiction.

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Passing on more than genes…

Adaptive Consequences is a bit of a ‘slasher’ book, a melting-pot of science-fiction/thriller/domestic noir genres in one story. Though the narrative came first and the classification later, the ‘domestic noir’ element was always a fundamental part of the story arc; Adaptive Consequences (AC) is as much a dissection of family dynamics as it is about neuroscience, the future, and power struggles. With the prevalence of social media, we live in a world where we frequently define ourselves in relation to other people. Whether we want to cultivate and align with their opinion or lifestyle, or we actively distance ourselves away from them, the tentpoles that help navigate our life are often planted in relation to those around us. When we look at the formative tentpoles that habitually stick with us throughout life, they are usually derived from our family of Read more…


Adaptive Consequences – my theory of adaptation and evolution

As Adaptive Consequences (AC) is set in the future, exploring adaptation and what the world could look like was a narrative necessity. In 15+ years from now, neuroscience and brain augmentation developments, I imagined, would be at a level relative to serve the early seedlings of my plot. The more I researched and hypothesised what the future could look like, the more I geeked out about it all. I didn’t start writing AC with a speculative fiction or a sci-fiction pedigree. I was, at that point, a Sci-Fi virgin – it wasn’t a genre that I actively read or wrote about – so the charm of discovering and writing a potential future-world was a shiny and glistening concept. Our world constantly develops and changes, mostly to improve our quality of life. In AC, adaptation is essential for survival, evolution and Read more…


My favourite books of 2017

As I was looking at the list of my favourite books of 2017, I was struck by how different each one was from the other. Some were biting, others beautiful; some were tangibly descriptive, others were so honest and stripped back, by the end of the chapter they had me feeling naked.  One thing all of the books did have in common, was that they weren’t my usual taste. That might be why I responded so strongly to them. Some I read because they received excellent reviews, some because I thought there might be useful elements for my writing and others, I read purely to mix things up. The best compliment I could give an author/book, would be to describe how it will stay with me in the future. Looking at the edit, it was clear each book had something Read more…


Are we all anarchists now/yet?

Anarchists, rebels, revolutionaries and insurgents; or, in my novel’s case, Autonarmies. The consensus of meeting one used to prompt eye-rolling and the metaphorical layering of one’s defences. Anarchists are ‘punks’ who socially exclude themselves; they’re hyper-sensitive; they have nothing-better-to-do; they’re sensationalists, right? Who are we to deconstruct and disrupt civilisation? Who can be bothered? What’s the worst that can happen? Um…. Recent events suggest we should challenge and question, and people are incited enough to do just that. The seemingly questionable and irresponsible fiscal decisions made by our Head of State (and wider family), as detailed in the Paradise Papers, is a timely example of people in a position of power and leadership advocating one thing, but their actions demonstrating another. Add to that the recent reports about sexual aberrations of power in Westminster, and the shady tactics employed by Read more…